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Great questions on depression

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  • Opublikowany 19 sie 2022
  • Thanks to Neil Oliver and GB news for an excellent series of questions with massive implications for good health and health care.

Komentarze • 0

  • Christin Woodard

    I was diagnosed with and medicated for bipolar disorder and depression from age 14 to 34. I changed my diet, quit drinking and quit the meds in the end of 2019/ beginning of 2020. In the last 3 years my life has spiraled upwards. I lost 60 lbs, got a new career, healed my family and more. Our medical system is fucked.

  • stereomike111

    I'm one of the endless victims of patients who have had their life diminished by the current paradigm of mental health care; shoddy theoretical basis, poor diagnostic tools, lack of informed consent for treatments, overuse of powerful drugs with little patient tailoring, and outright gaslighting and then abandonment after requesting help for persistent side effects. And just incompetent doctors. One gets to be quite bitter about it finding out the scam has been ongoing for decades.

  • golden oriole silver birch

    I was a psychiatric nurse for 30 years. It appeared to me that for many patients, especially those that end up in secure units, low self-esteem, poor education & employment opportunities & social isolation were the most significant factors in their mental health problems. Medication can be helpful, but for many is less important than having health care professionals that really listen, are non-judgemental, and facilitate help with finances, housing & other social needs.

  • Kitty Bitts

    Among the nursing faculty at Simmons College in Boston, MA some thirty years ago was a Professor, Dr. Phyllis Moore. She was a brilliant woman who taught us that psychological depression is the result of chronic sadness, sorrow that the patient is unable to mourn or cope with that builds up over time and changes the brain chemistry. Listening to depressing music, angry music, watching violent, angry or unhappy movies or shows, all this can exacerbate the chemical change that comes with chronic sadness. Helping a depressed patient isn't just giving them a pill. It's helping them build the coping skills necessary to overcome their sorrow and helping them find comfort.

  • Valerie Low

    What a fantastic communicator Dr Campbell is. He has kept me sane throughout the pandemic. Thank you.

  • M Arch
    M Arch  +298

    Some of us (psychotherapists) have read enough research and worked with enough depressed people to have known for decades that antidepressants are almost never helpful, and often harmful. The APA actually stopped framing this as a “chemical imbalance” issue in the late 90s, but no other hypothesis had been able to replace it (read: no other extremely profitable treatment had been established). This new meta-analysis shows nothing new. We’ve known that people have as much variance (e.g. serotonin levels) within the depressed population as without the depressed population. Robert Whitaker and others were lambasted for writing about this over the past 20 years. I was called (by colleagues and others) a radical for insisting that there is no evidence that depression is resolved by taking SSRIs.

  • David O Donovan

    As a man that's had lots of mental health problems over the years, I can agree you that the placebo effect is real, positive thinking makes a huge difference, devine intervention is definitely real, and drugs do make a huge difference, and have helped to save my life during series clinical depression, including in the last few weeks of my life.

  • brenda126176

    I learned as a hospitalized college student, that my basal metabolic rate was so low that it was not recorded on machine.

  • teatowel11

    What an epic crossover!

  • turboslag
    turboslag  +17

    Having suffered from clinical depression for over 30 years I can say that medication has never worked for me. During the time I did take them, they just made me feel worse with some very unpleasant side effects. Nothing I have ever tried has worked, medication, therapy or counciling, either 1 to 1 or group. I have just had to accept it as the way I am. Looking back, to before my first breakdown, to my childhood and adolescence, I see that depression was evident then but it wasn't until that first nreakdown that it became a severe blight on my life. It is a terrible affliction, and until very recently one which received no recognition or sympathy from any authorities or organisations that I have to deal with in regard to the administration aspect of ones life.

  • Elizabeth Kendal

    That was an absolute treat! Two great heroes in discussion ...with realism, humility and wonder. Listening to Dr Campbell talk about the mysteries of the brain while Neil Oliver quietly lights up in delight was awesome. The "audacity of intervention" ... the "need for humility"... Music to my ears. That was so special. Thank- you Neil... Love you Dr Campbell... from Melbourne Australia 🦘

  • Hoobs mr groove

    I wondered if depression can be a learnt thing, something you pick up as a young child because of circumstances and the environment around you. I think the expectations on a children and schooling can play a big part on the psyche of the child.

  • Jonathan Sturm

    For many years I suffered from periodic depression. More than a decade ago my sister, a highly qualified nurse, discovered she was badly deficient in vitamin D. She suggested I be tested for the same and indeed I too was deficient despite, like my sister, a keen vegetable grower who spent many hours out in the sunshine. Since taking a daily supplement of Vitamin D I have not suffered from depression. Anecdotal? It works for me.

  • Laur
    Laur  +24

    I’ve had severe anxiety for 6 years now. It came to a head last year after several traumatic events in the space of a few months. I suddenly got really ill with what seemed like stroke symptoms. It was horrific. I was diagnosed with vestibular migraine and spent half the year in bed not being able to move without feeling dizzy. My life completely stopped!It took that to realize my anxiety and constantly stressing caused my body to spin out of control. It’s worrying what bad mental health can do to your physical health. I’ve had to completely change the way I think from the fear of relapsing. What gave me bad anxiety before I have to literally force my brain to relax and let go. It’s been hard but I think I’m slowly reconditioning myself( I hope).

  • Virginia Lally

    When I was a medical student in the 70's, I got anxious and depressed and was prescribed anti-depressants by one of the doctors who was on the medical school faculty There were no SSRI's back in those days I think they were the old tricyclic anti-depressants. They didn't help much and after taking them for awhile I started having chest pains Luckily my doctor was a caring person and told me to stop taking them right away Nowadays they would probably tell me to just take a higher dose. I've been lucky that,except very rarely when I have flashbacks to some of the traumatic events in my life, I have managed to be okay for many years I guess most people with depression also have complex stories to tell I find it particularly interesting that this video points out the link between anxiety and depression Now that I think about it-very true

  • Jonny A
    Jonny A  +20

    For anybody struggling. For some reason I'm sure I fell into depression at one point. About four-five years later, even though nothing tangible had changed and if anything was worse, it lifted. I don't know how or why it came and went to pass on that knowledge but hope that just knowing it can is of some assurance.

  • Hilary berger

    Psychedelic’s definitely have potential to deal with mental health symptoms like anxiety and depression, I would like to try them again but it’s just so hard to source here

  • Silverpoint

    I could listen to BOTH of you talk together for hours! What a great meeting of considerate, intelligent people.

  • alan carre
    alan carre  +198

    I could, and

  • Sasha Bella

    Fantastic piece!!! We truly need more people like you in the medicine/medical world. I only came across your channel this month and I love your dedication to making the science understandable to the rest of us out here who are WANTING the facts and want to learn. I WANT the truth and I also know and understand science and medicine are infallible and ever changing as is everything in life. Keep up your AWESOME work😊❤️